Hunting for a good read

After a stressful few weeks, I needed a book that could take me away from it all.

I admit to beginning Read Herring Hunt by V.M. Burns with some trepidation. Her first book, The Plot is Murder, was so good that I knew the second could not match up. Well, I shouldn’t have worried, except, perhaps about getting some sleep because this a book that I had to read straight through. Continue reading →

Off the shelf

There were two advantages to having the nasty virus we’ve been trading back and forth this winter: I felt absolved of guilt for slacking off on my housework (pet care was non-negotiable according to my clowder and pack); and I also felt free to huddle under the covers and read all day. One of the books I read over the weekend was Shelved Under Murder, which involves one of my favorite places – a library – and adds a community festival, art, and murder to the index.

Librarian Amy Webber lives with her long-widowed aunt in a sedate Virginia Mountain town where she runs the local library, which is, like many small town libraries, short on funds and long on strange characters. One of the characters is a reclusive artist who is going to donate paintings to the library’s sale at the festival; unfortunately Amy finds the artist dead and the artist’s husband, a less well-known artist, is missing. Two of Amy’s late uncle’s paintings may be offered in place of the dead artist’s work but some people are a bit too eager to get a peek at his oeuvre. While clues are being sorted and secrets come to light, there is another murder. And all along the way romances are checked out, shelved, mended, re-shelved, and renewed.

I quite enjoyed Shelved Under Murder but quickly figured out that it was the second story in the series because of the constant mentions of events in the first, including who the villain of that story was. Anyone who wants to get maximum enjoyment from the series (and I do hope there are more) should start with the first book, A Murder for the Books.

Now I’m feeling better and have left the library stacks for a church – a cathedral no less – in Jeanne M. Dams new Dorothy Martin mystery Crisis at the Cathedral. It’s a bit of a thriller and I hope it ends well.

Required disclaimer: I was provided an advance reader’s Kindle copy of the book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review, which is what this is. If you are interested in reading the book and you click on the book’s title in this blog, I may get a few pennies to help fund my reading habit. #ShelvedUnderMurder #NetGalley #CrisisAtTheCathedral

Tightly Knit

Once every few years, the knitting bug bites me and I dig out the tote with my yarn and patterns. Sometimes I start a new project and other times I pick up the stitches on an old project, like the teddy bears I’ve become rather adept at producing. What? You can knit more than sweaters and caps, you know. The urge is often quelled, though, by the help my clowder of cats is determined to give me, and I pick up a book to read instead.

Murder She Knit attracted me with its cover showing a black cat and yarn, since I’ve had experience with the combination of knitting and cats, but both had a rather minor, though important, roles in the story.

Pamela is a widow with a somewhat empty nest since her daughter is away at college, though there is that stray cat she feeds and her Knit & Nibble group. With the group meeting at her house, Pamela is happy that an old friend will be joining them – happy until she finds her friend’s body in the hedge, stabbed by a knitting needle, while hunting for a feral cat’s bowl. She and her best friend cast about for a solution, wondering if one of the knitting group could be the culprit. In the midst of knitting, crocheting, dealing with odd neighbors and a visiting daughter, and making tasty treats, the pair follow the pattern and unravel a yarn mystery as well as uncover a killer.

It’s a cozy involving food, so there are recipes at the end as well as some advice for beginning knitters. I’m hoping to see more of the cat and perhaps some interesting knitting patterns in the next in the series which, yes, I plan to read.

Required disclaimer: I was provided an advance reader’s Kindle copy of the book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review, which is what this is. If you are interested in reading the book and you click on the title link in this blog, I may get a few pennies to help fund my reading habit. #MurderSheKnit #NetGalley